Homemade enteric coated capsules

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69ron

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Oct 13 07 9:07 PM

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Homemade enteric coated capsules - how it's done


To make homemade enteric coated capsules you fill a standard gelatin capsule with your alkaloid, oil, or other active substance, and then you close the capsule. You then dip the capsule in food grade shellac. You then dry the capsules completely and then dip them again. Dry and repeat one more time, and dry once more. This produces a coating that’s insoluble in water that can’t be penetrated by stomach acids.


Any kind of non-toxic shellac can be used. It must say on the package that’s it’s non-toxic when dry. “Food grade” shellac is simply standard non-toxic shellac mixed with ethanol. The same stuff is sold at hardware stores.



Enteric coated capsules have great utility for things that either upset the stomach or must be digested in the intestines. The following is just a list of ideas to get started with:


* it can completely block the nausea caused by mescaline by disallowing the mescaline to absorb in the walls of the stomach.

* it will prevent many drugs from re-salting to hydrochlorides by bypassing the hydrochloric acid in the stomach secretions. This can be of great benefit for some things. Possibly freebase bufotenine will benefit from this, allowing it to be absorbed in the intestines as freebase bufotenine rather than the nauseating bufotenine HCl.

* it should allow elemicin to work better. It seems that elemicin doesn’t work well unless it’s digested in the intestines.

* it allows you to make capsules that are water resistant, and better protected from the environment. Enteric coated capsules will last longer.


This information is taken from drugs.com:

Toxicology
Shellac NF is food grade and is listed as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA.

 

Shellac is the purified product of lac, the red, hardened secretion of the insect Laccifer (Tachardia) lacca Kerr. This tiny insect sucks the sap of selected trees and bushes, and secretes lac as a protective covering. The name lac is said to derive from lakh , the Sanskrit word for one hundred thousand, a reference to the very large number of insects involved in producing appreciable amounts of the product.

 

Lac is cultivated in India, Thailand, and Burma. The whitest lac is produced by insects infesting the kusum tree ( Schleichera trijuga ). The harvester cuts twigs coated with lac into small pieces called sticklac. The crude material is ground and soaked in water to remove debris and insect bodies. The remaining material is soaked in sodium carbonate, which removes laccaic acid, a complex mixture of at least four structurally related pigments. The resulting granules retain the yellow pigment erythrolaccin and are dried to form seedlac. Further treatment by melting, evaporating, or filtering yields shellac.

 

Chemistry
The National Formulary XV recognizes 4 grades of shellac: Orange, dewaxed orange, regular bleached and refined wax-free bleached. The grades differ in the manner in which the seedlac is treated. Orange shellac is obtained by the evaporation of filtered ethanolic solutions of seedlac. It may be dewaxed by further filtration. Regular bleached shellac is obtained by dissolving the seedlac in aqueous sodium carbonate at a high temperature. After filtration, a bleaching agent (such as sodium hypochlorite) is added. The resin is removed by sulfuric acid precipitation. Refined wax-free bleached shellac adds another filtration step to remove the waxes.

 

The exact chemical composition of shellac is unknown. It appears to be composed of a network of hydroxy fatty acid esters and sesquiterpene acid esters with a molecular weight of about 1000. Aleuretic acid, r-butolic acid, shellolic acid, and jalaric acid are the major constituents. The composition is a function of the source and time of harvest of the sticklac. Variability in the product may be a problem for commercial users of shellac. The physical properties of shellac also vary. For example, the reported melting point ranges from 77° to 120°C. Shellac is soluble in ethanol, methanol, glycols, glycol ethers, and alkaline water.


 

This info is from http://antiquerestorers.com/Articles/jeff/shellac.htm

 

Pharmaceutical - shellac is used to coat enteric pills so that they do not dissolve in the stomach, but in the lower intestine, which alleviates upset stomachs. Its also used as a coating on pills to "time release" medication.

 

Food Coatings - because of its FDA approval, shellac is used to coat apples and other fruits to make them shinier.


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69ron

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Oct 13 07 9:07 PM

A little bit of an update here.

SWIM is in the process of making an elemicin capsule. He made some mistakes alone the way. He tried one and it started leaking and had to do it again. If the capsule contains liquid you need to follow specific steps to get it to work right.

1 - Fill the longer bottom piece of the capsule with liquid. While keeping it held upright you put the shorter capsule top on tightly.

2 - Holding the capsule by the top of the capsule (the shorter piece of the capsule), dip the bottom into the liquid shellac all the way past the point where the capsule top joins the capsule bottom. Don't submerge it completely. The top end of the shorter capsule piece (the capsule top piece) should have no shellac on it. The bottom part of the top piece where it meets the bottom piece should be well coated with shellac so that it forms a liquid tight seal when it dries. The entire bottom piece should be well coated with shellac. We don’t dip the top piece completely into the shellac so that we have a non-coated place the capsule can be held from while it dries.

3 - After dipping, while keeping it upright so the capsule doesn’t leak, carefully remove the capsule from the shellac being sure not to touch any part of the wet shellac. Air dry the capsule upright with something holding onto the dry uncoated portion of the capsule top piece only. At no time should anything touch the wet shellac coated areas of the capsule or the process will be ruined and you’ll need to dip it again. It’s dried upright so that excess shellac will drip off the capsule and no liquid will leak out of the capsule while it’s drying.

4 – let the capsule hang until it’s completely dry. This can take 8-24 hours. Once the bottom half dries completely the liquid is sealed inside the capsule and you can move onto the next step.

5 - Flip the capsule upside down so that the smaller partially coated top piece is pointing down. Holding the dried completely coated longer bottom piece of the capsule you then dip the top piece of the capsule into the liquid shellac past the point where it joins the bottom piece. Don't submerge it completely. You'll need a portion of the bottom piece dry so it can be held while the rest of the capsule dries.

6 – After dipping, holding it upside down you lift it out of the liquid shellac and air dry it with it held upside down by the dry bottom piece only. At no time should anything touch the wet shellac coating or you will need to dip it again.

7 – let the capsule hang until it’s completely dry (8-24 hours).

For the best coating, repeat the entire process one or two more times.

NOTE: Don’t try painting the shellac on the capsule. SWIM tried that, it’s really hard to do and leaves streaks of uncoated areas on the capsule. You NEED TO DIP IT to produce an even coat. Only an even coat will act as an enteric coating.

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69ron

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Oct 13 07 9:08 PM

This is not as easy as it sounds.

This takes forever to dry. SWIM messed up 2 times so far. I wish there was something that could speed up the process.

Beware that using a food dehydrator to speed up the drying causes leaks when your using liquid filled capsules. Apparently the heat build up causes pressure build up in the capsule (should of known that would happen!) and that causes some of the liquid to force it's way out of the capsule. So you have to dry it at normal room temperature. This was just discovered, and so now he's got to start all over again!

If using liquid, it's a good idea to let the capsule have a lot of empty space in it to avoid leaks.

It's a little frustrating. SWIM was hoping to try this yesterday but it looks like it won't be done until tomorrow!

Maybe adding a gelling agent to the liquid before putting it in the capsule would help prevent leaks. Leaking is the number one problem with this. Any leak will ruin the whole process.

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Oct 13 07 9:08 PM

Ok, so the capsule test is done. The non-coated capsule almost completely dissolved in a pH 2.5 solution. The coated capsule was 99% intact but had a very small pinhole in it and was leaking a very tiny amount of its elemicin oil solution into the water (less than 5% leaked). Its possible this hole was already there and was simply an air bubble in the shellac. When the coated capsule was removed, its structure was still good, except for the tiny pinhole. The non-coated capsule was no longer a capsule, just a few pieces floating in the water.

So this definitely works. 1 hour and only a very tiny pinhole is present in the coated capsule. That's long enough for the capsule to move into the intestines in most cases.

Unfortunately because of the development of a tiny hole after 1 hour, SWIM can no longer use this elemicin capsule to test the enteric coating process in his own stomach. The tiny hole will mess up the test. He'll need to make another capsule. Damn!

I think one possibly reason for the tiny hole is that maybe the elemicin oil is leaking out of the capsule and dissolving the shellac? I'm not sure. There was no leak before putting it in the pH 2.5 solution though, so I'm sure what caused the hole. An air bubble is likely the cause.

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Oct 13 07 9:09 PM

Update, SWIM's next enteric coated capsule is now completely dry (he made a few). He's dipped it in water to see if there are any leaks. There are none. This capsule is taken on a FULL stomach with a tiny bit of water.

If the capsule coating does not work, SWIM should get stimulant effects only, and they should come on in about 15-30 minutes and be pretty strong.

If the capsule coating works, the elemicin should not be absorbed in the stomach, so it should take at least 1 hour before the effects start, and it shouldn't have that speedy feeling, but instead be psychedelic.

It's possible that the pH of the stomach alone is actually hydrolyzing the elemicin into a stimulant. I don't really know. But whatever happens when it sits in the stomach too long definitely ruins the effects.

I'll report back in a while.

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Oct 14 07 12:35 AM

Yes it worked very well according to SWIM.

To find it food grade shellac do a search using Google for "Shellac NF".

Giving out vendor links is not allowed on this forum.


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#7 [url]

Oct 14 07 7:48 AM

I'll have to bookmark this page. This info is gold. All you need is a dipper that can dip 100 capsules at a time. This is good for a lot of things that get destroyed by stomach acid.

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Oct 17 07 3:47 AM

Can't you just buy enteric coated capsules?

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69ron

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Oct 17 07 4:19 AM

It's said to be completely impossible to make enteric coated capsules that are fillable. Watch out for scams. There's a place that sells these at a high price. Its probably a scam. No major capsule vendor sells such capsules.

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Oct 21 07 1:42 AM






It's said to be completely impossible to make enteric coated capsules that are fillable. Watch out for scams. There's a place that sells these at a high price. Its probably a scam. No major capsule vendor sells such capsules.


-69ron





So... I understand that without coating over the seam there are concerns about the integrity of the seal.  But, I have seen and used some equipment that was incased in what was essentially a rubber or plastic capsule.  The device could be submerged entirely and no water ever got in.  I believe this was because the 2 halves of the capsule overlapped a great bit.  Maybe more than an actual gelcap overlaps.  

Could these fillable enteric capsules possibly work this way.  They could be overlapped enough to create a seal that lasts long enough? You did your tests based on how long the shellac covered would last before leaking.  I could see how a slightly different capsule shape/design could allow for a watertight seal...especially if we are talking about a coating designed for the task.

How cool would it be if each piece of the capsule was coated each with a part of a binary agent that when combined..sealed the capsule?  

Even if these capsules that already exist do not seal good enough, could we coat the seal with shellac and save all the trouble hassle of dipping capsules?  I imagine painting the shellac on the seam. Even dipping...if the capsule was pre-coated, you would only have to dip one side.






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69ron

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Oct 21 07 9:32 AM

Maybe those fillable enteric coated capsules do actually work and are not a scam. I've read they can't, but not everything you read is true right.

I don't have much money so I'm weary of scams. If you have the extra money, why not just get them and try them out. It's possible everyone is wrong and they do actually work. That would be great. No more dipping!

If they leaked, then painting a ring around the leaking area with shellac to seal it sounds like it would work.

Its a simple matter to test them. Just put some salt inside, close the enteric coated capsule, and leave it in water for 1 hour-2 hours. If it doesn't leak much by then, it should work. Even if it leaks a little by that time its good enough. A regular capsule will not last an hour. Before an hour, all the salt will be in the water.

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Oct 22 07 2:58 AM

I gather all you need is for the two halves to join tight enough to prevent too much leakage. It doesn't need to be bullet proof does it?

Why don't they make the entire capsules out of something that is itself enteric? Why coat at all?

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69ron

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Oct 25 07 8:52 AM

That's a great idea.

I bet it will work really well with morning glory seeds. It will probably block the nausea completely. I'm very curious if it will alter the effects any.

What we need is a drawn out plan for a homemade dipping machine that's easy to make for just a few bucks.

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69ron

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Nov 2 07 7:50 AM

You can use any shellac that's FDA approved for use on kitchen utensils. That kind is NF. It just doesn't say so on the container. You can only use shellac NF on kitchen utensils. The FDA doesn’t allow non-NF grade shellac to be used on kitchen utensils like cutting boards, wooden spoons, etc.

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#20 [url]

Nov 29 07 7:02 PM

Just got some in.

Will do some testing on different coating methods to find an efficient form, and test it with nutmeg oil within a day or two.

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